Category “Science”

Car of the Future

This one-hour program is divided into six chapters. Hitting The Road. Projections suggest that by 2050 there will be two billion vehicles on the world’s roads, two and a half times as many as there are today. The “Car Talk” duo, brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi, hit the road in search of the car of the future. Hydrogen Fuel Cells. Iceland, with a thousand times fewer people and cars than the U.S., has introduced the world’s first hydrogen-fueled public buses in an effort to curb dependence on imported oil. Towards Biofuels. Tom and Ray look at possible new ways to make ethanol. Such...

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Technology: World War 2.0

Josh Davis of Wired magazine investigates an internet botnet attack of Estonia’s banks and newspapers. Wired Science reports on cardiac surgery performed by a “robo-doc”. Adam Rogers explores the disappearance of home chemistry sets. Ziya Tong delves into technology that is helping children with Asperger’s Syndrome by translating facial expressions into...

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PT 3/3 Nerds 2.0.1: A Brief History of the Internet

Wiring the World Nerds 2.0.1: A Brief History of the Internet (1998) is a three-hour documentary film written and hosted by Mark Stephens under the pseudonym Robert X. Cringely and produced by Oregon Public Broadcasting for PBS. A sequel to Triumph of the Nerds, Nerds 2.0.1 documents the development of ARPANET, the Internet, the World Wide Web and the dot-com bubble of the mid and late 1990s. It was broadcast two years prior to the collapse of the dot-com bubble. The documentary was later turned into a book of the same title by series director Stephen...

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Nerds 2.0.1: A Brief History of the Internet

Nerds 2.0.1: A Brief History of the Internet (1998) is a three-hour documentary film written and hosted by Mark Stephens under the pseudonym Robert X. Cringely and produced by Oregon Public Broadcasting for PBS. A sequel to Triumph of the Nerds, Nerds 2.0.1 documents the development of ARPANET, the Internet, the World Wide Web and the dot-com bubble of the mid and late 1990s. Episodes included:Networking the Nerds, Serving the Suits, and Wiring the World. It was broadcast two years prior to the collapse of the dot.com bubble. The documentary was later turned into a book of the same...

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Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires

This film chronicles the rise of the personal computer/home computer beginning in the 1970s with the Altair 8800, Apple II and VisiCalc. It continues through the IBM PC and Apple Macintosh revolution through the 1980s and the mid 1990s at the beginning of the Dot-com boom. It includes interviews with Apple Computer’s Steve Jobs and Microsoft’s Bill Gates. This three-part film first premiered on PBS in June 1996. The series was released in VHS format soon after airing but is now out of print. A release on DVD by Ambrose Video in 2002 was noted by product reviewers on Amazon.com and...

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Pedigree Dogs Exposed

Pedigree dogs are suffering from genetic diseases following years of inbreeding, an investigation has found. A BBC documentary says they are suffering acute problems because looks are emphasised over health when breeding dogs for shows. The programme shows spaniels with brains too big for their skulls and boxers suffering from epilepsy. The Kennel Club says it works tirelessly to improve the health of pedigree dogs. Pedigree animals make up 75% of the seven million dogs in the UK and cost their owners over £10m in vets' fees each week. Poor health The programme, Pedigree...

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A Universe From Nothing (Lecture)

Lawrence Krauss gives a talk on our current picture of the universe, how it will end, and how it could have come from nothing. Krauss is the author of many bestselling books on Physics and Cosmology, including “The Physics of Star Trek.” If you’ve ever wanted to answer that annoying question, “how could the Universe have formed from nothing”, then watch this video. Lawrence Krauss is funny, informative, and if you watch the entire video (it’s over an hour long, so you might need to pause it a few times), he will blow your mind. Lawrence seems like a pretty cool...

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EP 6/6 The Private Life of Plants

Broadcast 9 February 1995, the final episode deals with plants that live in hostile environments. Attenborough visits Ellesmere Island, north of the Arctic Circle, to demonstrate that even in a place that is unconducive to life, it can be found. Algae and lichens grow in or on rock, and during summer, when the ice melts, flowers are much more apparent. However, they must remain close to the ground to stay out of the chilling wind. In the Tasmanian mountains, plants conserve heat by growing into ‘cushions’ that act as solar panels, with as many as a million individual shoots grouped...

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EP 5/6 The Private Life of Plants

Broadcast 2 February 1995, the fifth programme explores the alliances formed between the animal and plant worlds. Attenborough dives into Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and contrasts the nocturnal feeding of coral, on microscopic creatures, with its daytime diet of algae. Some acacias are protected by ants, which will defend their refuge from any predator. Besides accommodation, the guards are rewarded with nectar and, from certain species, protein for their larvae as well. Fungi feed on plants but also provide essential nutriment to saplings. The connection is never broken throughout a...

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