Nutrition and Behavior Aspartame (Lecture)

In this lecture, Dr. Russell Blaylock explains one of the most important connections between nutrition and our health, how nutrition affects our behavior.

Citing a series of important studies, he shows that good nutrition can powerfully enhance our memory, mood, and behavior in a socially desirable way.

Like wise he shows us that poor nutrition can lead our youth into a world of violence, crime, depression and suicide.

By using an impressive array of studies on both juvenile and adult prisoners, Dr. Blaylock demonstrates these principals and outlines specific measures you can take to protect your children from these detrimental effects. Most importantly, he shows us that it is never too late to make these nutritional changes.

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  • Guest

    amazing…. thank you for this brilliant lecture

  • guest

    fantastic. highlights how the crucial and over-looked foundation in life that is our diet can have such a pervasive affect on not just our own individual health, but also on the collective health of our society overall i.e. its shameful neglect adding significantly to the problems in areas such as crime, health and mental health, and education.

  • guest

    fantastic. highlights how the crucial and over-looked foundation in life that is our diet can have such a pervasive affect on not just our own individual health, but also on the collective health of our society overall i.e. its shameful neglect adding significantly to the problems in areas such as crime, health and mental health, and education.

  • guest

    fantastic. highlights how the crucial and over-looked foundation in life that is our diet can have such a pervasive affect on not just our own individual health, but also on the collective health of our society overall i.e. its shameful neglect adding significantly to the problems in areas such as crime, health and mental health, and education.

  • Eppie

    This is ridiculous. Most of his conclusions are based on correlational data and his explanation of alcoholism was reductionist. To say it is purely down to blood sugar is wrong.

  • Fairval

    In other words, everything is going to make you hypoglycemic and you’ll be a mentally ill alcoholic who can’t pay attention and is tired/hyper/all problems that exist. Come on…I’d like to see these “studies”. Schizophrenia is caused by food allergies? Yeah…that’s when I stopped watching.

    • L.D.

      Hm, likewise I kept waiting for a bit more explanation of the studies he was getting his information from. To be generous it was thought provoking, but I lost interest completely when he said that vaccinations had been proved to cause autism and ADHD.

  • http://hyungnam.blogspot.jp/2013/06/web-design-tools-avatar-signature_63.html Hyungnam Gu

    Aspartame has been found to be safe for human consumption by more than ninety countries worldwide,[27][28] with FDA officials describing aspartame as “one of the most thoroughly tested and studied food additives the agency has ever approved” and its safety as “clear cut”,[29] but has been the subject of several controversies, hoaxes[3] and health scares.[30]

    Initially aspartame was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1974; however, problems with Searle’s safety testing program, including testing of aspartame, were discovered subsequently. The approval was rescinded the following year, but after outside reviews of the problematic tests and additional testing, final approval was granted in 1981. Because allegations ofconflicts of interest marred the FDA’s approval of aspartame,[6][29][31] the U.S. Government Accountability Office reviewed the actions of involved officials in 1986 and the approval process in 1987; neither the allegations of conflict of interest nor problems in the final approval process were substantiated.[6][32]

    In addition, the Centers for Disease Control investigated in 1984 and was unable to find any significant epidemiological associations to serious risk or harm.[33]

    Since December 1998, a widely circulated email hoax cited aspartame as the cause of numerous diseases.[34]

    The weight of existing scientific evidence indicates that aspartame is safe at current levels of consumption as a non-nutritive sweetener.[8] Reviews conducted by regulatory agencies decades after aspartame was first approved have supported its continued availability.