Poverty in Chicago

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Rating: 8.7/10 (50 votes cast)
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Directed and Produced by Brian Schodorf this film is an exploration of how the drug afflicted homeless population affects society as a whole with exclusive interviews with Chicago’s top social and political leaders.
Schodorf’s relationship with the men allows the viewer to get a true inside look at what life is like as a permanent resident of the streets.
Poverty in Chicago, also, investigates the devastating loss of over 150 lives in the winter of 2006 at the hand of a deadly heroin epidemic.
“Ive told you. Now, I’m going to show you,” says one homeless man who leads the crew through the most crime infested areas of Chicago’s south and west sides, inside the drug trade itself.

Poverty in Chicago, 8.7 out of 10 based on 50 ratings

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  • http://twitter.com/TjPercipere Tashi

    Overall, this is a very good documentary that succinctly presents the issue of the “urban underclass” as it is known. However, it focuses almost exclusively upon the male side of the issue. In addition, it fails to address the structural causes of poverty to the extent that is possible by focusing too heavily on the symptoms and conditions surrounding the issue.

  • Dillon

    Great documentary

  • Dillon

    Great documentary

  • Rebeltz2010

    It certainly makes , you think and be more aware of other peoples predicaments and that the well off, could help a bit more through direct action, like supporting the meager servises they  have, but the goverment ,can spend trillions on a war that they started and know they’ ll never win??????

  • outofoz

    what a boring doco…..what was the point of it??

    • Eamonn

      I think you should experience poverty before you open your mouth in future daddys girl ( or boy )

    • Eamonn

      I think you should experience poverty before you open your mouth in future daddys girl ( or boy )

    • Eamonn

      I doubtif you’ve ever even walked down through kings cross have you

    • Eamonn

      I doubtif you’ve ever even walked down through kings cross have you

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  • Kunt

    EEEEEEEEERRRRRRR!!!!!!! sorry! try again ;) your documentary is SHITY… just dosnt stand up…….. mabe you should put more thought into your questions lol…… its like watching a retard having a brain fart for 40 minutes…. i feel stupider having seen it…..

  • Fitzer

    Really enjoyed this, a great insight.

  • Anonymous

    I’m from Chicago and I remember skid row on Madison Ave. when I was a teen in the 60′s.  It was a place that we didn’t go even though we were from McKinley Park.  I don’t live in my home town now and I really wish I did.  I wish I could help the homeless there.

  • Portman21

    I don’t see why it should be the responsibility of the wealthy to fix a social problem. Why isn’t the government, elected for the people by the people, making an effort to do something about it? Wealthy people have gotten to where they are (mostly, but not all the time), through hard work, entrepreneurship and intelligence – it is not their responsibility to fix the world’s problems merely because they have more money…

  • Portman21

    I don’t see why it should be the responsibility of the wealthy to fix a social problem. Why isn’t the government, elected for the people by the people, making an effort to do something about it? Wealthy people have gotten to where they are (mostly, but not all the time), through hard work, entrepreneurship and intelligence – it is not their responsibility to fix the world’s problems merely because they have more money…

    • Cig

       Because clearly the people don’t care. If you think wealthy people shouldn’t bother to help the homeless, then why should anyone? I’m not sure who made the argument that only the wealthy should help the poor, or what you qualify as “wealthy.” Everyone should be involved in helping the poor, even the poor themselves. But if people like you don’t care, then nothing will be done.

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  • Nelson Espinosa87

    DEAR DIRECTOR YOU LACK EMOTION. WHEN THE GIRL ASKED IF YOU WERE SCARED,I GOT THEY IMPRESSION THAT YOU WERE KINDA COMING OUT LIKE A DICK. AT TIMES IT LOOKS LIKE YOU’RE REALLY NOT TAKING THIS GREAT DOCUMENTARY YOU DID SERIOUS…SHOW MORE INTEREST AND EMOTION.

  • rooferjess

    I don’t believe one person in this documentary, when they were young, said to themselves, “when I grow up, I want to be a drug addicted homeless person”.

  • rooferjess

    I don’t believe one person in this documentary, when they were young, said to themselves, “when I grow up, I want to be a drug addicted homeless person”.

  • Jane Fletch Doe

    Nearly 20 minutes into this and can’t stand to watch anymore of this. There is a lot that our society can do to help the less fortunate but if you want to be a better person you have to be proactive and TAKE ACCOUNTABILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS. I had yet to hear a single person point out where they had contributed to their misfortunes. Being a person involved in 12 step programs for the last 15 years you hear this shit all of the time. You have to be the person that initiates the change.

  • Nidhish Mehra

    This is the truthly sorrowful movie. I have discussed this American poverty situation with mine good friend Raghavendra Raj Kumar – the most famous actor and singer in all Gandhinagar – indeed Gujurat. He is very kindness man. Please if any charity institute for the poverty alleviation in Chicago would contact Raghavendra Raj Kumar to organization the charity singing festival. India can help you. twitter.com/mailrrk

  • bodey

    im glad this filmmaker let a lot of these homeless folks tell their story. Ive been homeless and its amazing how much people look at you like an animal as opposed to a human that made mistakes or had misfortune. its amazingly alienating and can break a mans spirit faster than anything else ive ever expienced…….also later on when he said that the mobile outreach van ‘struggles’ to meet the needs of addicts who need treatment, that was the understatement of the century…..it essentially the icecream man of needle exchange….that’s all. they pull up and they give you freshies bleach and a spoon, that’s all. theyre actually harm reduction which don’t get me wrong is flat out necceasary. addicts ill find a needle, they need a clean one. a thouroughly strung out junkie will rob a bio hazad box of dirtys and steal a gallon of bleach to clean them.if their sick with no fit.