Slavery By Another Name

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For most Americans this is entirely new history. Slavery by Another Name gives voice to the largely forgotten victims and perpetrators of forced labor and features their descendants living today.

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation.

The film tells how even as chattel slavery came to an end in the South in 1865, thousands of African Americans were pulled back into forced labor with shocking force and brutality.

It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold, and coerced to do the bidding of masters.

Tolerated by both the North and South, forced labor lasted well into the 20th century.

Slavery By Another Name, 6.7 out of 10 based on 3 ratings

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  • Anonymous

    I see we’re still entrenched in the false memory syndrome of historical fabrications; another programming reinforcement of the big lie that slavery is only to be associated with Black slavery at a specific time under specific circumstances an almost isolated case (aside from the millions of surviving holocaustians) in history. This is a good example of propaganda.

    America was built on the blood and misery of WHITE slave labour from Ireland, England, Scotland primarily where 98% of the population were dispossessed and criminalised peasants. Among them were also members of the indiginous nobility, turfed off their ancestral lands in Northern Ireland by Yiddish backed Cromwell and shipped out in droves to Virginia and Barbados to name two slave camps. Forced to breed with black slaves, black overseers and any white male who fancied it, the Irish and English slave women had the worst hell of all.

    Black slavery was introduced via the founding fathers all of whom were slavers and traders. We all know surely who the merchants who drove the trade were and are.

    But it was not until very late into the colonisation of America and the West Indies that Blacks were introduced in any great numbers and were used against the Southern States by London-backed Northern slave traders on the pretext of ‘ending black slavery’.

    Disgusting that blacks are being programmed to believe it was the poor miserable white slaves who were the culprits. But then, they’re happy to back anyone, even their own persecutors, if it suits their collective ego. The onus is on Blacks to learn their history within the historical context of white history. Whites are the most ignorant of their roots and fall for the ‘collective guilt’ of black slavery for absolutely no valid reason. They allow the Yiddish Slavers to then impose PC directives which gag free speech, enslaving us all futher.

    • Gabryelknyte

      Well said…

    • rotor888

      I love that you aren’t interested in satisfying political correctness, and say what you think- and say it plainly. I don’t know enough to comment (that’s the beauty of this), but I’m sick of being guilty because I’m white and male. I’ve never enslaved, let alone belittled anyone because of their race or creed, but to many I am automatically guilty. I’ve never met more racist people than “the oppressed”. I really want everyone to be equal. Can’t we learn from the past and not live in it? I’m going to read more on this because of what you said, and because it’s potentially inflamitory to those who want to keep the hate alive. CHEERS.

  • guest

    smh at the ignorance of these comments

  • AlexEconomics

    1. It’s stupid for you to feel guilty for the actions of others. I’m kind of sick of hearing white males complain about that. If you don’t like feeling guilty: stop. No one’s going around blaming you for slavery every day. When was the last time black person came up to you to berate you for the actions of your ancestors?

    2. The guy who wrote the first comment is inaccurate. Black slavery was introduced by the dutch, not our founding fathers. The rest of it is wrong too, but it’s not even worth correcting. What an idiot, and an anti-semite. Yiddish slavers? Come on, where’d you pick that up, a Klan rally?

  • Me

    AlexEconomics: You make too much sense, you must be a Yiddish slaver! (This is sarcasm.The disclaimer is here in case you are an intelligent challenged individual who is reading this.)
    What is a Yiddish slaver, anyway?

  • SuperiorEuropean

    More anti-British bs from dirrty americans in the comments section.

    Nice to see you openly praising one another’s racism.

    Thank you for confirming why the bad dna and the insular, ignorant descendants of European village idiots that is the usa needs to be culled from this otherwise beautiful planet…

    Soon.

  • Laura

    This doc was removed by the “User” already. I never got the chance to see it! Why is it still listed then by Documentary Heaven?

  • http://www.facebook.com/rodney.holt1 Rodney Holt

    If you want to know what it feels like to be black read my article “Slave Mentality” there will always be and opressor and an opressed. Blacks make up 12 percent of the population in the U.S. and whether white people want to be oblivious to it or not> racism does exist in this country> the U.S. and although there is a mixed President in office when you get right down to it things really haven’t changed. There are plenty of good white people whom aren’t racist and yes you will get stereo typed for being one just like us good black poeple get stereo-typed as being thugs and not to mention the other subliminal message that have for years been perpetuated against us in the media but either way I keep and open mind try to judge people on their own individual merits theres good and bad in everything in life some people get all the breaks an others don’t> whoever said life would be fair? But I have seen the ugly face of of racism stare me in the eye for so many years and yet I’m still a very loving person but if you want to know what it feels like to be black for those of you that aren’t> I tried to articulate it to the best of my abilities > Slave Mentality Minoritie’ Report> it’s a philosophy a mindset still exercised today.