Then and Now

A short documentary made about the survivors of the earthquake and tsunami that occurred in Japan in March 2011.

“We visited a town on the east coast called Ishinomaki, part of which was completely erased by the tsunami. Made up of interviews with survivors, Then and Now lets the survivors tell us about their experiences during the event and the progress of the recovery that has been taking place since.” – From the producer

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  • Jj

    I salute those people for there bravery in rebuilding their city.  Still a long way to go, but what is sad about all of this is how the Japanese government just leave and abandon them like that. Japan, of all places, its hard to imagine corruption is kicking well and alive, as people in top places pocket millions of donations from several countries ( Taiwan alone donated over 100 million dollars to Japan only to be pocketed by corrupt redtape institution officials and then they turned their backs on those suffering people….hard to imagine its happening in Japan. What happened to that NIPON Spirit?? That pride Japanese once have in themselve as One People?? Disappearing gradually I think…. taken over by greed and corruption.
    The world has changed and still changing, and to tell you the truth, Japan is now just another Asian country that has lost their dominance as a super power in the region. The hard lesson is if anything happens again, don’t even think that the government is coming to help you. Tie your boot strings and ready to move out and find a better life. simple.

  • Laura

    A beautiful, little film, very enjoyable to watch, even though some of the stories of loss were so sad.
    However, some survivors are creating a whole new community, where people care about each other and help their neighbors, with out any red tape to get in the way of change.
    If this happened in Ontario, the Bi-Law officers would be going out of their minds!
    A brave new world.
    Think about it.

  • Dare to dream

    A beautiful message of hope – though not without great poignancy – thank you very much