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God Grew Tired Of Us

In 1987, Sudan’s Muslim government pronounced death to all males in the Christian south: 27,000 boys fled to Ethiopia on foot. In 1991, they were forced to flee to Kenya; 12,000 survived to live in a U.N. camp in Kakuma. Archival footage documents the 1,000 mile flight; we see life in the camp.

We follow three young men who repatriate to the U.S. John Bul Dau goes to Syracuse, and by the film’s end, becomes a spokesperson for the Lost Boys and Lost Girls of Sudan; Daniel Abol Pach and Panther Bior go to Pittsburgh. All work several jobs, send money back to the camp, search for relatives lost in the civil war, acclimatize to the U.S., seek an education, and miss their homeland.

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  1. I found this documentary extremely rewarding. This documentary makes the
    entire Sudan conflict more approachable to those everyday people.
    Although it does detail some facts in the beginnings, it’s really just a
    fantastic biography about the great things that some of these Lost Boys
    are doing after they survived through refuge. I hope I’m not the only
    one who was laughing throughout when they were showing the boys adapting
    to the new culture (laughing in a humourous, not cruel way, but hey I
    just came back from Africa so maybe that is only why haha). A highly
    emotional and great account to the work that needs to be done and is
    starting to be done in Sudan (like John Bal Dau’s work).

  2. I found this documentary extremely rewarding. This documentary makes the entire Sudan conflict more approachable to those everyday people. Although it does detail some facts in the beginnings, it’s really just a fantastic biography about the great things that some of these Lost Boys are doing after they survived through refuge. I hope I’m not the only one who was laughing throughout when they were showing the boys adapting to the new culture (laughing in a humourous, not cruel way, but hey I just came back from Africa so maybe that is only why haha). A highly emotional and great account to the work that needs to be done and is starting to be done in Sudan (like John Bal Dau’s work).

  3. absolutely one of the best documentaries i have even seen. just brilliant!

  4. i loved this documentary, i feel it is essential everyone watches it. thank you for sharing it with me.

  5. It was a blessing for me to watch this documentary even that is heartbreaking. I’m not from Africa, but it help me to understand the life that many of our borthers and sisters from others culture have to face in there life. Do I apreciated my life more after watching this yes I do. My love,peace and prayers for my brother in Sudan, God bless ya all ♥

  6. regardless of what the purpose and/or government situation was, my heartbreaks for the common people who were chased out of their home and isolated from their family. what has taken place in sudan should not be taken lightly, we must educate the youth for they will one day lead the nation, as well as the entire western society. God bless Sudan

  7. It disturbs me that every comment above me is ma.ufactured. The UN doesn’t give a shit about anyone. The Sudanese did not commit genocide (although I would understand wanting to get rid of Christians, Muslims, or anyone of “faith “) and the UN certainly didn’t try to help anyone. Before you shit on me understand, I fought in the gulf war Somalia and Bosnia. The UN was not there to help. They were there to try to usurp control in a region they had just destabilized. Its a lie. All of it.

  8. I think it should be required viewing in american middle and high schools to educate our children about how things are in other parts of the world and remind them about the freedoms they take for granted.

  9. I’m Sudanese and watching this is just depressing. I know live in Ireland with my family because that shit was just inhuman

  10. I haven’t seen this documentary because it seems like it would be too heartbreaking to watch. I’m guessing that’s why some people shy away from the Sudan situation.

  11. I haven’t seen this documentary because it seems like it would be too heartbreaking to watch. I’m guessing that’s why some people shy away from the Sudan situation.